“Fordson” Movie

“Fordson” is a feature length documentary film that follows four talented high school football players from Dearborn Michigan as they gear up for their big senior year rivalry game during the last ten days of Ramadan, a month when Muslims traditionally fast every day from sunrise to sundown.

The story is set against the backdrop of the stunningly beautiful Fordson High School, a public high school built by Henry Ford in 1922, which was once all white, but now boasts a 98% Arab population. As our team readies itself to play its affluent, cross town rival, we unearth the adversity faced by a community that is desperately holding onto its Islamic faith and trying to gain acceptance from their fellow U.S. citizens in post 9-11 America.

Through the eyes of the team, their coaches, and their fans, we get an unprecedented glimpse inside the lives of a community that is home to the largest concentration of Arabs in any city outside of the Middle East, and their determination to hold on to the American Dream.

You can contact the producers at fordsonthemovie@gmail.com

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Among the Righteous

“Among the Righteous” is PBS documentary on Muslims saving Jews from the Holocaust and even some examples of Muslim complacency in the ethnic cleansing of Jews in Europe and the Mid-East. You can watch a documentary or order the book and DVD online here.

Among the Righteous

Movies: Shahada and the Infidel

Infidel looks like a hilarious British comedy about a Muslim who finds out he was adopted and originally Jewish. The trailer is below:

To contrast Shahada is a serious and dramatic movie about the struggles and some very real issues of being Muslim and understanding Islam in modern Germany. The trailer looks promising:

The Taqwacores Movie

Still of 'The Taqwacores' movie

The Taqwacores novel has inspired The Taqwacore Movie. On it’s website it says

Originally handed out for free in parking lots as xerox copies, The Taqwacores novel has now been published in the United States, England, Italy, and France.Since it’s release in 2004, The Taqwacores has gone on to inspire a real-life punk-Muslim scene, resulting in the formation of bands such as The Kominas.The book has been mentioned and reviewed in publications such as Newsweek, Rolling Stone, The Guardian, NPR, BBC, The Sun, The Globe and Mail, The Daily Star, and many more. The Taqwacores motion picture was most recently featured on Al-Jazeera English and in The New York Times.

The exclusive and promising indie movie has just featured it’s trailer on the MTV website apparently as a 2010 Sundance Film Festival Video highlight.

With characters like:

  • YUSEF: Pakistani-American engineering student,
  • JEHANGIR: ’77-style drunk punk Sufi hero,
  • UMAR: hardcore straightedge Sunni,
  • RABEYA: burqa clad, riot grrl feminist
  • FASIQ: Indonesian skater-punk stoner
  • and AMAZING AYYUB: shirtless Shi’a skinhead

These characters I don’t believe are a stretch of mind in reality because I can honestly say I met those archetypes in real life [esp the Indonesian skater stoner, engineer student and the burqa feminist]. However to some this movie may break naive prejudices.  I guess the notions of South Asians and South East Asians as the model minority or the women in burqas as oppressed stereotypes will go out the window. I honestly haven’t read the book and have hear horrible things about it. But I do think regardless of the blasphemy perhaps the common American will look at Muslims more complexly and humanely?

Mohammed Ali – Aerosol Arabic

Some of you may have heard of Mohammed Ali – Aerosol Arabic,

a graffiti artist who is famous for his spiritual murals.

He’ll be at an event, more info below:

Mohammed Ali (aka Aerosol Arabic)’s Writing on the Wall will see the renowned graffiti artist join forces with leading international poets in front of a live audience for a special one-off show at Birmingham Repertory Theatre on Thursday 21 January 2010.

Having established himself in the arts scene for the past decade, Mohammed Ali’s latest project sees an idea thought up four years ago coming to life. With the guidance of legendary Hip Hop theatre director Jonzi D, Ali will accompany three internationally renowned poets on stage for a radical live art show.

The line-up for Writing on the Wall includes Zena Edwards, who has been performing as a professional poet for the last nine years, manipulating the boundaries of language and experimenting with the ways people hear and interpret the spoken word. She will be joined by American poet Amir Sulaiman who has twice featured on HBO’s Def Poetry programme, and Dreadlock Alien, who was Birmingham’s Poet Laureate in 2006. During the two-week lead-up Mohammed will also be working with local visual artists to create unique images, before embarking on the one-night-only performance on Thursday 21 January 2010 in Birmingham Repertory Theatre’s scenic workshop.

Inspired by the theme of ‘3’, the production will build towards a show that interweaves sights and sounds to inspire the audiences’ imagination, provoking thoughts and creative fires. During the performance, live poetry and painting will blend seamlessly in front of and all-around the audience.

If that didn’t get excited enough here’s some more:

Here’s a moving piece flimed by Musa Syeed about one of Aerosolarabic’s murals in New York called “Sacred Street Art”:

Sacred Street Art from Mohammed Ali – Aerosol Arabic on Vimeo.

From West Bank to “Amreeka” the Movie

An email I received. The trailer looks fantastic

The Muslim Public Affairs Council’s Hollywood Bureau and National Geographic Entertainment invite you to attend a series of premiere events of the widely-acclaimed film “Amreeka,” across the country. Each screening — held in Southern California, New York and Washington, DC — will be followed by a Q&A with writer/director Cherien Dabis.


Dabis’ first feature film, “Amreeka,” received a five-minute standing ovation when it was screened at the Sundance Film Festival, and has received rave reviews by film critics.

Inflected with drama and humor, the film chronicles Muna, a single mother from Ramallah, and Fadi, her teenage son, and their bittersweet adjustment to a multicultural way of life after they move to the American Midwest in the early 1990s, just as U.S. troops enter Baghdad. How mother and son cope with each other and adjust to the American relatives who welcome them is as much the revelatory subject of “Amreeka” as their reactions to the strange behavior of ordinary people in this land of liberty. “Amreeka” opens up in theaters in September.

We have a limited number of tickets available for each screening. Two tickets will be given to the first 15 people to email Amreeka-RSVP@mpac.org with their RSVP for each screening. Please provide your name, phone number and which screening you are interested in attending.

NEW YORK
Monday, August 17
8:30 p.m.
Walter Reade Theatre
70 W. 63rd Street, New York, NY 10023

IRVINE
Wednesday, August 19
7:30 p.m.
Westpark 8 Cinema
3755 Alton Parkway, Irvine, CA 92606

LOS ANGELES
Thursday, August 20
7:30 p.m.
Writers Guild Theater
135 S. Doheny Drive, Beverly Hills, CA 90211

WASHINGTON, DC
Wednesday, September 2
7:30 p.m.
Grosvenor Auditorium
National Geographic Society
1600 M Street, Washington, DC 20036

MPAC’s Hollywood Bureau recently held a screening of “Amreeka” during the annual ISNA convention in Washington D.C. During that event, Dabis shared her personal experiences growing up Arab in Omaha, Nebraska, and the great pains she took to cast authentically Arab and Arab-American actors in the film.

MPAC’s Hollywood Bureau serves as a bridge between the Muslim American Community and the entertainment industry by fostering relationships with industry professionals, providing consulting and expertise on film and television projects, and creating networking opportunities for aspiring Muslim filmmakers, screenwriters and actors.

Syurga Cinta (Heavenly Love) Malay movie

Syurga Cinta

Syurga Cinta

Interesting Malay teeny movie. I wish the hijabi had more of a personality instead of being “perfect” and lecturing all the time. But it’s nice and weird to see hijabis in dramas and movies too.

You can watch it here in English subs here.